Monday, March 24, 2014

Do You Hate Being Alone?



Some people are terrified of alone-time.

I mean, Freddy-Kreuger-is-in-my-bedroom terrified.

Some people would rather spend time with a person they utterly dislike than be alone. Some people can’t fathom spending any waking minute alone for fear they’ll go mad. Some people have it all wrong.

Alone-time is one of the greatest habits of a successful person. 

You see it is in alone-time that you can hear God speak in your spirit the clearest. When you are around other people, it is harder for you to hear God speaking because Tyrone is talking, or Jennifer is singing, or Sean is rapping, or cousin Fran is cussing, or bestie Sarah is gossiping or a host of other people are yapping and drowning out the voice of God within you. It’s hard to hear the voice of God when everyone around you is yelling. 

Alone-time is one of the greatest habits of a successful person.

It is also in alone time that you tap into your creativity the most. You are not distracted by anyone else and you can focus on deep introspection and thought. Think about Isaac Newton. He was sitting under the tree ALONE when the apple supposedly fell on his head and sparked the ideas of gravity in his mind. He was able to focus on what had happened and think about what it meant. What if he was sitting under the tree with a group of people? Do you think he would have been as interested in the apple falling as he was? He might have had a thought about the apple falling but someone may have started a conversation about something else that would have distracted him or if he mentioned the apple falling one of his buddies in the group may have persuaded him it was nothing of significance by saying something like, “My goodness, Isaac, it’s just an apple that fell from the tree; don’t be so dramatic about it”. Don’t underestimate the value of alone-time. 

Alone-time is one of the greatest habits of a successful person.

Alone-time affords you the opportunity to pray, meditate, read good books, and recharge your mind, body, and soul to get spiritually refilled/centered as a preparation mechanism to go out into the world and engage lovingly with others. (Oprah Winfrey swears by it.) I can personally attest to the value of alone-time. Most of the ideas I’ve ever come up with have been when I have been by myself (that’s when I’ve written some of my best short films, short stories, blog posts, etc).  I’ve also had some of the best moments eating, laughing, and dancing solo – granted, I'm an introvert with a natural love for solitude so I might be a bit biased in the matter. Point remains, you shouldn't discredit alone time. 

Alone-time is one of the greatest habits of a successful person.

Don’t let the media and society fool you. Spending time alone does not mean you’re lonely, a loser, and/or boring. On the contrary; spending time alone means you’re pretty darn wise. Alone-time gives you the perfect opportunity to spend time with yourself listening to the Holy Spirit within you, appreciating your divine purpose, creating valuable content, and a host of other activities.

Of course, you also must spend time with others – it is ESSENTIAL to appreciate and enjoy the moments spent with family, friends, communities, etc. Some of my best and most cherished moments have been spent with others – my family mainly - eating (it’s almost embarrassing how I always start a list off with eating), laughing, dancing, crying, watching television/films, talking, and much more. Those moments cannot be replaced and I want even more of them. What I am saying is that you must also make it a priority to spend a significant amount of your time, daily, working on yourself, by yourself, because it is important for the health of your mind, body, and soul. I consider “alone-time” to be “healthy-time”, and every great life requires “healthy-time” folks. 

So, get healthy already/:


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8 comments:

  1. You've said it all. ♡♥♡♥♡♥♡♥

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  2. I LOVE and cherish my alone time :) Also, here's a great quote from one of my favourite french writers/philosophers, Blaise Pascal: 'All of humanity's problems stem from man's inability to sit quietly in a room alone.' Extreme claim but I totally get where he's coming from.

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    1. Thank you for commenting Vegan:)

      I haven't heard of Blaise before but I think his quote is spot on! And I don't even consider it extreme; it's "hitting the nail on the head" for me:)

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  3. You've made some fantastic points. I love alone time. I do not take it for granted. Sure I should be more social (introvert problems) but so many things just work better for me when I'm by myself.

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    1. Thank you, LaTonya:) I have to force myself to go out and be social because I have similar "introvert problems" too. What makes it easier for me is when I remember that my God-given purpose isn't just for my life but for the service of others too so I need to communicate and find ways to connect with people, even though it makes me uncomfortable at times.

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  4. Have read a few takes on owning being alone, but this is one of the best :) I love being alone and find it does help my creative juices and helps me to relax and refocus on my life. But I do find I have to justify it to others or even make up fake plans so that it doesn't come across as a childish and "Christmas special"! Great post, oh and love the "freddy is in my room" kind of scary :) x

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    1. Thank you, Sez! I know what you mean about feeling like I need to justify my choice for alone time. It's that underlying fear that people might think it's weird or "loser-ish" behavior. I like to remind myself that doing some "different" things have produced better results in my life so I better continue enjoying it.

      And I'm glad that you loved the freddy reference lol



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